Interview: David Pilling – co-author of Epic Fantasy The Best Weapon

Epic Fantasy The Best Weapon

Today we release our epic fantasy novel, The Best Weapon, on paperback and kindle. To mark the occasion I interviewed my co-author David Pilling.

I asked him about his character, Archpriest Flambard, The Best Weapon and The World Apparent (the fantasy world in which the story takes place) in general.

Below the interview is a link to my answers to his questions on his blog.

1) What was your inspiration for the character of Archpriest Flambard?

He’s a mixture of Cardinal Wolsey, Jabba the Hutt and Baron Vladimir Harkonnen, as well as various bits and pieces dropped straight from my imagination. I wanted to portray a sly, Machiavellian, physically grotesque man who made the world around him dance like a puppet on a string.

At the same time I didn’t want him to be entirely unsympathetic. He is, at bottom, a human being who believes he is doing the best for the realm he is sworn to protect, including the sacrifice of his own desires. By the end of the story – if I’ve done my job properly – the reader should feel at least a sliver of sympathy for him.

Archpriest Flambard by Zennor Matthews

Archpriest Flambard by Zennor Matthews

2) What would you think of him if you knew him?

I would probably think ‘My God, what an appalling bastard’ and take pains to get away from him as fast as possible! Flambard is a dangerous man to be around. He tends to see other people as tools, to be used and disposed of as he sees fit. It’s impossible to be his friend, though occasionally someone makes the mistake of trying.

3) Do you think it is important that a writer always empathises with their characters, even the villains?

Yes. Otherwise they are just cardboard cut-outs, and of no interest (unless you make them funny). The reason a character like Darth Vader lodges in the public imagination is because of his striking physical appearance and enigmatic character – he was good once, now he’s black as sin, but can he be turned back again? The same with Long John Silver, a murderous pirate who readers are initially supposed to hate, but nevertheless charming and not completely devoid of scruples. A character with no chance of redemption, however slight, instantly becomes less interesting because it’s almost impossible to empathise.

4) What are your thoughts on good and evil characters? Can anyone ever be all good or all bad? Can they change from one to the other?

I’m not sure if a character can be plausibly depicted as entirely good – everyone has a dark side, whether or not they care to admit it. It’s possible for someone to be entirely bad, especially if they have convinced themselves that they do bad things for the benefit of others. The obvious example is Hitler, who committed all kinds of evils in the belief that it was all for the greater good of his country. Flambard is similar in that respect: he is entirely ruthless and there is nothing, literally nothing, he won’t do in defence of the state. At the same time he’s no coward or hypocrite, and demands the same levels of absolute loyalty and self-sacrifice from himself that he demands of others.

5) Archpriest Flambard lives in a society similar to real life medieval Europe. How important is it to consider real life history when creating a fantasy culture?

Speaking for myself, I found it important because my first love is history, and it was only natural that I should draw much of my inspiration from the same source. I usually write historical fiction, and it was fun not to have to check my facts all the time, and to cherry-pick what I liked from different historical periods. In general I don’t think its terribly important to consider or draw from history when creating a work of fantasy: the most important thing is the creation, whether you have managed to depict a living, breathing universe, rather than where you get your ideas from.

6) In The Best Weapon, we only see a small part of The World Apparent. Will later books explore the world further, and what can we expect to discover?

They will indeed. The sequel, The Path of Sorrow, explores a land to the west named Temeria, which has a bit of an Ancient Assyrian/Byzantine feel to it. Future installments will ‘fill in’ other spaces on the map. There is the potential for setting entirely separate tales inside the same world – much like Robin Hobb does in her Realm of the Elderlings series.

The World Apparent

The World Apparent

 

7) What do you hope to achieve in terms of your own development as a writer when you write a novel?

To write something that is an improvement or progression from the last book. I’m not sure I always manage it, but it’s the effort that counts…(probably)…

8) What are your writing plans for the immediate future?

Busy busy busy. I plan to release new editions of Book Two and Three of my series The White Hawk (set during The Wars of the Roses), a new edition of the sequel to Folville’s Law (the first book I ever had published back in 2012), and the sequel to The Best Weapon. I’m also working on Book Four of my Leader of Battles series (an Arthurian saga set during the Dark Ages) and am toying with ideas for a belated sequel to The Half-Hanged Man (a novel about medieval mercenaries set during the 14th century). As well as various other projects. So there’s plenty to keep me going!

* * * *

You can keep up with David’s work by following his blog: Pilling’s Writing Corner. You can also check us out at the Bolton and Pilling Fantasy Fiction Facebook page.

Click here to read my interview on David’s blog

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